Theresa May

Release date:
Feb 03, 2019
Theresa May, in full Theresa Mary May, née Theresa Mary Brasier, (born October 1, 1956, Eastbourne, Sussex, England), British politician who became the second woman prime minister of the United Kingdom in British history in July 2016 after replacing David Cameron as the leader of the Conservative Party.

May, Theresa; Brexit

Early Life And Start In Politics

The only child of an Anglican minister, Theresa Brasier grew up in rural Oxfordshire. She attended both state-run and private schools before matriculating at the University of Oxford, where she studied geography. At a dance at Oxford, another student, Benazir Bhutto, the future prime minister of Pakistan, introduced Brasier to Philip May, whom she married in 1980. Both she and her husband undertook careers in banking. She worked for the Bank of England before moving on to the Association for Payment Clearing Services (APACS), where she served as head of the European Affairs Unit and senior adviser on international affairs.

May began her political career in 1986 as councillor in the London borough of Merton, a position she held until 1994. After failing as a Conservative candidate for the House of Commons twice, May was elected to represent Maidenhead in 1997. She moved quickly from the back to the front bench, becoming shadow secretary of state for education and employment (1999–2001), shadow secretary of state for transport, local government, and the regions (2001–02), shadow secretary of state for the family (2004–05), shadow secretary of state for culture, media, and sport (2005), and shadow leader of the House of Commons (2005–09). In 2002 May became the first woman to chair the Conservative Party, and in that capacity she strove to increase the number of female Tory MPs and to modernize the party, famously saying it had come to be viewed as the “nasty party.” Even as she earned a reputation as a moralistic no-nonsense legislator and tough negotiator, May also gained attention for her stylish footwear.

Ascent To Power

When Cameron became prime minister in 2010, May was named secretary of state for the home department. As the longest-serving home secretary in over a century, May advocated limiting immigration and was critical of the police. In 2016 she stood with Cameron in opposing “Brexit” (British withdrawal from the European Union). When Cameron announced his imminent resignation after voters chose to depart the EU in the national referendum in June, it appeared likely that the “Leave” campaign’s chief spokesman, Boris Johnson, would become the new Conservative leader. After the loss of some key supporters, however, Johnson pulled out of the race. May entered a pool of four other candidates and survived winnowing votes by parliamentary Conservatives to emerge with Energy Minister Andrea Leadsom as the final candidates, to be voted upon by general party members by September 9. Almost before that process could begin, Leadsom withdrew her candidacy in response to a controversy surrounding comments she had made about motherhood as a qualification for leadership (May had no children). All of this set the stage for May to quickly become the new Conservative leader, and she became prime minister on July 13, 2016.